Ken Wright Carter Vineyard Pinot Noir 2014

$59.99
$53.99

SKU 12014

750ml

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Located just one mile from Canary Hill in the Eola Hills, Carter Vineyard is lower on the hillside yet has a leaner and less fertile soil. It is mainly Nekia soil, which is formed from weathered basic rock. It lies at an elevation of 325' and was planted in 1983. This bottling is comprised of the Wadenswil, Dijon 777, Dijon 667, Dijon 115, and Pommard clones. The wine is much firmer than Canary Hill in its youth but evolves beautifully after a few years in bottle to show dark fruits and fresh, healthy earth scents. Approximately 650 cases are produced. The vineyard is owned by Jack and Kathleen Carter, and managed by Mark Gould. Cellar the Carter Vineyard for a few years before serving with filet mignon, lamb and salmon dishes.

Ken Wright Cellars is devoted to showcasing the unique qualities and complexities of specific vineyard sites. They believe that the source of the grapes is everything, which is why they work with many small vineyards, typically owned by hard-working families who dedicate themselves to growing exceptional grapes. They also believe that they have chosen the Willamette Valley's best sites for Pinot Noir.
Category Red Wine
Varietal
Country United States
Region Oregon
Appellation Willamette Valley
Brand Ken Wright
  • ws90

Wine SpectatorFirm and focused, with spicy, savory overtones to the blueberry and tomato leaf flavors, lingering easily on a fine-grained finish. Best from 2018 through 2024. 1,511 cases made.

Harvey Steiman, February 28, 2017
  • wa89

Wine AdvocateThe 2014 Pinot Noir Carter Vineyard comes from west-facing vines planted in 1983 and the parcel was purchased by Ken Wright last year. It has dark plum and boysenberry bouquet with subtle earthy tones, though it needs just a little more precision to come through. The palate is medium-bodied with a slightly savory entry, a "meaty" Pinot Noir with fine density on the slightly chewy finish that has a keen thread of acidity that maintains freshness.

Neal Martin, June 2016